The stolen address book – Seth Godin

Another gem from Seth Godin:

 

I used to ask, “If you stole Steven Spielberg’s address book, would it help you get a movie made?”

The point was that even if you had the phone numbers and names, calling them up and saying you’d stolen them wasn’t worth very much. The data has no value without trust and connection.

Now, twenty years later, all the address books have been stolen. Everyone has all the data. Identifying the right people (or spamming everyone) is easy and cheap.

Which makes the point even more urgent than ever: Without trust and connection, access to data is worthless.

 

Link: https://seths.blog/2020/06/the-stolen-address-book/

Entrepreneurship is not a job – Seth Godin

You don’t apply. You don’t get a salary. No one picks you.

Bragging about how much money you’ve raised or what your valuation is a form of job thinking.

Entrepreneurship is a chance to trade a solution to someone who has a problem that needs solving.

Solve more problems, solve bigger problems, solve problems more widely and you’re an entrepreneur.

It’s tempting to industrialize this work, to make it something with rules and bosses and processes. But that’s not the heart of it.

The work is to solve problems in a way that you’re proud of.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/typepad/sethsmainblog/~3/3R1yFaK-cto/sethsblog~Entrepreneurship-is-not-a-job.html

It’s that process that is magic

You know, one of the things that really hurt Apple was after I left John Sculley got a very serious disease. It’s the disease of thinking that a really great idea is 90% of the work. And if you just tell all these other people “here’s this great idea,” then of course they can go off and make it happen.

And the problem with that is that there’s just a tremendous amount of craftsmanship in between a great idea and a great product. And as you evolve that great idea, it changes and grows. It never comes out like it starts because you learn a lot more as you get into the subtleties of it. And you also find there are tremendous tradeoffs that you have to make. There are just certain things you can’t make electrons do. There are certain things you can’t make plastic do. Or glass do. Or factories do. Or robots do.

Designing a product is keeping five thousand things in your brain and fitting them all together in new and different ways to get what you want. And every day you discover something new that is a new problem or a new opportunity to fit these things together a little differently.

And it’s that process that is the magic.

– Steve Jobs

On being absurd

“Only those who attempt the absurd…will achieve the impossible.” – M.C. Escher

I came across this quote on my twitter feed & like every other quote, I yelled “wow” in my head & carried on. But there was something different about this!

I was able to relate to it very closely. But why?

Quenching on my thirst, I created a timeline of my life in my head – from my childhood till today. Compared it with those of my friends. I found a peculiarity – “utter absurdness”.

I mean seriously – who on earth would not enjoy his childhood for making bills in dad’s restaurant or not enjoy this teenage for designing websites (entrepreneurial stint) ! ME.

I have been absurd all through! Even today, my psyche simply stops me to do everything everyone else is doing.

All this obviously does not mean that I have a achieved the impossible, but yes it definitely assures that I’m on the right track – achieve the impossible.

Somehow I can’t believe that there are any heights that can’t be scaled by a man who knows the secrets of making dreams come true. This special secret, it seems to me, can be summarized in four C s. They are curiosity, confidence, courage, and constancy, and the greatest of all is confidence. When you believe in a thing, believe in it all the way, implicitly and unquestionable.

Walt Disney